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Our organization is dedicated to helping people in our community break through the cycle of poverty and mental illness. This includes raising awareness about the experience of living with mental illness, to end the cycle of poverty for those that seek our services, and build bridges in our community for those who are lost. Discover how your help makes an impact.


  • Payee Clients Housed

    92%

  • Payees eliminate debt in first 6 mos

    87%

  • Program Participants

    4023

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  • Clubhouse Accreditation
    Clubhouse Accreditation

    For Immediate Release    Media Contact
    Rachel Newell
    Director of Development 
    316-665-8605
    rachel.newell@breakthroughwichita.org

    BREAKTHROUGH CLUBHOUSE GARNERS THREE-YEAR ACCREDITATION

    Wichita, Kan., June 12, 2019 – Breakthrough Clubhouse, a pre-vocational program of Breakthrough/Episcopal Social Services, received a three-year accreditation in May as an affiliate of the Clubhouse International, an organization that develops Clubhouses around the world.  The recognition is significant, as it points to a clear demonstration of a Clubhouse’s commitment to excellence.  Accreditation is awarded to Clubhouses that adhere to the International Standards for Clubhouse Programs, providing opportunities for Clubhouse members to find employment, go to school, build meaningful relationships and live healthy lifestyles. 

    The process is a rigorous one - both evaluative and consultative.  It includes a clubhouse self-study, site visit, dialogs regarding Clubhouse leadership and improvement opportunities, and a written report.  

    The accreditation process is conducted by members of the Clubhouse International faculty for Clubhouse Development.  The final report noted, “Members have a strong sense of pride and ownership in the  Clubhouse, there’s a strong culture of employment and an extremely active advocacy with the Kansas State Legislature which is resulting in solid support of Clubhouses in other parts of Kansas.”  David Kapten, Program Director for Breakthrough Clubhouse added, “This is an empowering program that supports self-directed recovery. Each member of the Clubhouse is needed and wanted.”  

    Clubhouses are local community centers that provide members with opportunities to build long-term relationships that, in turn, support them in obtaining employment, education and housing, including:
    •    a work-ordered day in which the talents and abilities of members are recognized and utilized within the Clubhouse;
    •    participation in consensus-based decision making regarding all important matters relating to the running of the Clubhouse;
    •    Opportunities to obtain paid employment in the local labor market through a Clubhouse-created Transitional Employment Program. In addition, members participate in Clubhouse-supported and independent programs;
    •    assistance in accessing community-based educational resources;
    •    access to crisis intervention services when needed, and;
    •    Evening/weekend social and recreational events.

    About Breakthrough Clubhouse 
    The Clubhouse Model is a unique program serving 386 people with mental illness in 2018.  It’s one of four primary programs of Breakthrough/Episcopal Social Services. Breakthrough has been an accredited Clubhouse since 1997 and continues to be the only one in Kansas. Clubhouses are a powerful demonstration that people with mental illness can and do lead normal, productive lives.  

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  • Mental Health Funding for certified Clubhouses as identified and funded by the Lottery Vending Machine legislation that became law in 2018.

  • Drawing from our history, our new name is "Breakthrough."

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Everything You Need to Know About the Slow Food Movement

According to the Slow Food website, it is a “global, grassroots organization with more than 150,000 members and 2,000 food communities throughout 150+ countries.” The movement is promoted as an alternative to fast food, and is built on the belief that “the food we eat should taste good; that it should be produced in a clean way that does not harm the environment, animal welfare or our health; and that food producers should receive fair compensation for their work.”

The Slow Food Movement was founded in 1989 by Carlo Petrini. The native of the Piedmont region in Italy created the organization as a reaction to the opening of a McDonald’s in the historic Piazza di Spagna in Rome, as well as the poisonings and deaths that resulted from a wine producer’s choice to cut his wine with methanol to produce larger quantities of a cheaper product. Afraid that the unique regional flavors of Italy were in danger, he began promoting a lifestyle that preserved the important cultural heritage of food and the people who produce it.

Participating in the Slow Food Movement is a great way to become more connected to your community and the food you eat. Whether you go all in and totally adopt the lifestyle or simply incorporate some of the elements into the way you eat and think about food, these steps will help you get started:

- Buy whole ingredients and cook them yourself. Avoiding processed foods is great for your health, and taking the time to actually prepare your food is rewarding and can be a surprisingly relaxing activity.

- Grow some of your own food. If you’re lucky enough to have a spacious backyard, you can plant a big and luscious garden filled with delicious fruits and vegetables. But even if you live in a tiny studio apartment, you can still grow certain kinds of produce indoors or on a tiny windowsill. Nothing tastes quite as good as something that you’ve grown yourself.

- Shop locally. Visit farmer’s markets or seek out other growers in your area. It’s a great feeling to know the story behind what you’re eating, and you’ll be supporting the food producers in your community.

- Join a Slow Food group in your region. There are more than 100,000 Slow Food members all over the world, so it’s likely that you have a group near you. It’s a great way to meet more people who are passionate about preserving the quality of food and a chance to swap new ideas.

  • 35th Anniversary
    35th Anniversary
  • United Way
    United Way