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Our organization is dedicated to helping people in our community break through the cycle of poverty and mental illness. This includes raising awareness about the experience of living with mental illness, to end the cycle of poverty for those that seek our services, and build bridges in our community for those who are lost. Discover how your help makes an impact.


  • Payee Clients Housed

    92%

  • Payees eliminate debt in first 6 mos

    87%

  • Program Participants

    4023

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  • Clubhouse Accreditation
    Clubhouse Accreditation

    For Immediate Release    Media Contact
    Rachel Newell
    Director of Development 
    316-665-8605
    rachel.newell@breakthroughwichita.org

    BREAKTHROUGH CLUBHOUSE GARNERS THREE-YEAR ACCREDITATION

    Wichita, Kan., June 12, 2019 – Breakthrough Clubhouse, a pre-vocational program of Breakthrough/Episcopal Social Services, received a three-year accreditation in May as an affiliate of the Clubhouse International, an organization that develops Clubhouses around the world.  The recognition is significant, as it points to a clear demonstration of a Clubhouse’s commitment to excellence.  Accreditation is awarded to Clubhouses that adhere to the International Standards for Clubhouse Programs, providing opportunities for Clubhouse members to find employment, go to school, build meaningful relationships and live healthy lifestyles. 

    The process is a rigorous one - both evaluative and consultative.  It includes a clubhouse self-study, site visit, dialogs regarding Clubhouse leadership and improvement opportunities, and a written report.  

    The accreditation process is conducted by members of the Clubhouse International faculty for Clubhouse Development.  The final report noted, “Members have a strong sense of pride and ownership in the  Clubhouse, there’s a strong culture of employment and an extremely active advocacy with the Kansas State Legislature which is resulting in solid support of Clubhouses in other parts of Kansas.”  David Kapten, Program Director for Breakthrough Clubhouse added, “This is an empowering program that supports self-directed recovery. Each member of the Clubhouse is needed and wanted.”  

    Clubhouses are local community centers that provide members with opportunities to build long-term relationships that, in turn, support them in obtaining employment, education and housing, including:
    •    a work-ordered day in which the talents and abilities of members are recognized and utilized within the Clubhouse;
    •    participation in consensus-based decision making regarding all important matters relating to the running of the Clubhouse;
    •    Opportunities to obtain paid employment in the local labor market through a Clubhouse-created Transitional Employment Program. In addition, members participate in Clubhouse-supported and independent programs;
    •    assistance in accessing community-based educational resources;
    •    access to crisis intervention services when needed, and;
    •    Evening/weekend social and recreational events.

    About Breakthrough Clubhouse 
    The Clubhouse Model is a unique program serving 386 people with mental illness in 2018.  It’s one of four primary programs of Breakthrough/Episcopal Social Services. Breakthrough has been an accredited Clubhouse since 1997 and continues to be the only one in Kansas. Clubhouses are a powerful demonstration that people with mental illness can and do lead normal, productive lives.  

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  • Mental Health Funding for certified Clubhouses as identified and funded by the Lottery Vending Machine legislation that became law in 2018.

  • Drawing from our history, our new name is "Breakthrough."

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Basic First Aid Knowledge Necessary for this Summer

The fireworks are all blown off (well, most of them). The hot dogs are eaten. And Fluffy the Pomeranian is still hiding in the basement, seeking refuge in the bathroom closet until she can be sure no more untimely explosives will go off.

If you suffered some minor injuries over the Fourth of July, you aren’t alone. Around 1400 hand injuries, 900 leg injuries and 1000 head injuries occur. And around 200 people visit the emergency room per day due to fireworks-related injuries in the month around the July 4th holiday.

Even though the holiday is over, we still find it important to review some basic first aid tips and procedures. (Or perhaps you’ll find them useful for tending to your injuries sustained on the Fourth.) And if nothing else, you’ll be better prepared for the remainder of the summer.

Burns:

    1. Cool the burnt area under cold water for 20 minutes (do not use ice on burns as it may decrease blood flow and worsen burn)
      Remove clothing or other objects from area unless sticking
      Place sterile non-adherent dressing over the burn
      Elevate area to reduce swelling
  • Always seek medical attention if there is any question of the severity of the burn.

    Heat Exhaustion:

    1. Get person into a shady or air-conditioned location
      Lay the person down and elevate legs slightly
      Loosen clothing
      Have them drink cool water (avoid caffeine and alcohol)
      Cool them down with a damp sponge and fanning
      Monitor them carefully
  • Heat exhaustion can lead to heat strokes. Call 911 if the person’s condition worsens.

    Choking:
    The Red Cross recommends the “five-and-five” approach:

    1. Give five back blows between the person’s shoulder blades with the heel of your hand
      Give five abdominal thrusts (the Heimlich maneuver):
      Stand behind the person and wrap arms around the waist, tipping person forward slightly
      Make a fist with one hand and put it just above their belly button
      Grasp fist with other hand and press hard into abdomen with a quick thrust upward (as if lifting them up)
      Alternate between five blows and five thrusts until blockage is dislodged
  • If you’re a tech savvy person, check out the myriad of first aid apps available—it can be comforting to have a guide handy to reference. Here are a few of our favorites:

    First Aid by American Red Cross: Covering everything from safety tips for volcanoes to meningitis to standard first aid for cuts and burns, you don’t even need Wi-Fi to access this app’s plethora of information.

    Army First Aid: Including all basic first aid info as well as instructions for transporting injured people, this app is great if you’re away from home.

    Drops First Aid: Divided into three categories—summaries, videos and full instructions—this app will give you the proper amount of information needed to respond to any given situation.

    Of course there are many other potential medical problems not covered in this brief rundown, but hopefully you feel a bit more prepared for whatever the day might bring. (Although we certainly hope your days will go on without interruption). Now, rest up, drink lots of water and continue recovering from this long, glorious weekend of splendid American pride.

    • 35th Anniversary
      35th Anniversary
    • United Way
      United Way