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Our organization is dedicated to helping people in our community break through the cycle of poverty and mental illness. This includes raising awareness about the experience of living with mental illness, to end the cycle of poverty for those that seek our services, and build bridges in our community for those who are lost. Discover how your help makes an impact.


  • Payee Clients Housed

    92%

  • Payees eliminate debt in first 6 mos

    87%

  • Program Participants

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  • Clubhouse Accreditation
    Clubhouse Accreditation

    For Immediate Release    Media Contact
    Rachel Newell
    Director of Development 
    316-665-8605
    rachel.newell@breakthroughwichita.org

    BREAKTHROUGH CLUBHOUSE GARNERS THREE-YEAR ACCREDITATION

    Wichita, Kan., June 12, 2019 – Breakthrough Clubhouse, a pre-vocational program of Breakthrough/Episcopal Social Services, received a three-year accreditation in May as an affiliate of the Clubhouse International, an organization that develops Clubhouses around the world.  The recognition is significant, as it points to a clear demonstration of a Clubhouse’s commitment to excellence.  Accreditation is awarded to Clubhouses that adhere to the International Standards for Clubhouse Programs, providing opportunities for Clubhouse members to find employment, go to school, build meaningful relationships and live healthy lifestyles. 

    The process is a rigorous one - both evaluative and consultative.  It includes a clubhouse self-study, site visit, dialogs regarding Clubhouse leadership and improvement opportunities, and a written report.  

    The accreditation process is conducted by members of the Clubhouse International faculty for Clubhouse Development.  The final report noted, “Members have a strong sense of pride and ownership in the  Clubhouse, there’s a strong culture of employment and an extremely active advocacy with the Kansas State Legislature which is resulting in solid support of Clubhouses in other parts of Kansas.”  David Kapten, Program Director for Breakthrough Clubhouse added, “This is an empowering program that supports self-directed recovery. Each member of the Clubhouse is needed and wanted.”  

    Clubhouses are local community centers that provide members with opportunities to build long-term relationships that, in turn, support them in obtaining employment, education and housing, including:
    •    a work-ordered day in which the talents and abilities of members are recognized and utilized within the Clubhouse;
    •    participation in consensus-based decision making regarding all important matters relating to the running of the Clubhouse;
    •    Opportunities to obtain paid employment in the local labor market through a Clubhouse-created Transitional Employment Program. In addition, members participate in Clubhouse-supported and independent programs;
    •    assistance in accessing community-based educational resources;
    •    access to crisis intervention services when needed, and;
    •    Evening/weekend social and recreational events.

    About Breakthrough Clubhouse 
    The Clubhouse Model is a unique program serving 386 people with mental illness in 2018.  It’s one of four primary programs of Breakthrough/Episcopal Social Services. Breakthrough has been an accredited Clubhouse since 1997 and continues to be the only one in Kansas. Clubhouses are a powerful demonstration that people with mental illness can and do lead normal, productive lives.  

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  • Mental Health Funding for certified Clubhouses as identified and funded by the Lottery Vending Machine legislation that became law in 2018.

  • Drawing from our history, our new name is "Breakthrough."

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Want a New Best Friend? We’ve Got 5 Million Candidates

Approximately 5 million companion animals enter animal shelters nationwide every year. Yet only 20 to 30 percent of cats and dogs are adopted from shelters.

But they’re some of the most loyal companions you could ask for. If you’re interested in a loving pet who will love you unconditionally, consider looking into pet adoption.

Still need some convincing? (We know there are some negative misconceptions on shelter dogs). We’ve compiled a few of our favorite shelter dog hero stories below:

Rocky
As a timid, malnourished dog who had been shot, Rocky lurked around the Lassen County Animal Shelter. Dawn and Floyd Tibbets took Rocky home, and Rocky began traveling with Floyd on his frequent rock hunting trips in remote canyons.

On one such trip, Floyd suffered from an irregular heartbeat, which caused him to pass out repeatedly. Disoriented, Floyd tried to stumble back towards his car, but he couldn’t remember the way and his glasses were missing. Rocky stayed by Floyd’s side, licking his face to wake him up and led him back to the car. Without Rocky, Floyd’s wife believes that her husband may never have left the canyon alive that day.

Source: Huffington Post

Bear
Debbie Zeisler adopted Bear, a German Shepherd that nobody wanted, when she visited a shelter looking for a dog for her mother.

Debbie had suffered from seizures for over 18 years, and without any training, Bear picked up on her condition almost immediately. He quickly learned to tell Debbie when to take her medications and alert her when she was about to have an attack by leaning on her legs.

One day when Debbie ignored Bear’s warning, she suffered from a seizure, fell down the steps and was knocked unconscious. Bear went from door to door looking for help until he ran into an animal control officer. The officer saw Bear’s tag that stated he was a seizure alert dog and followed him back to his house where Debbie lay semi-conscious and disoriented. An ambulance was called and Debbie recovered from the incident.

Bear was honored with the 30th Annual National Hero Dog Award from the Society for the Prevention of Cruelty to Animals (SPCA) this year for his heroic act.

Source: Huffington Post

Pearl
Pearl was just another black lab that had been abandoned at a shelter when volunteers from the National Disaster Search Dog Foundation discovered her. Pearl trained as a search and rescue dog, and was paired with handler Ron Horetski of the LA County Fire Department. When the earthquake in Haiti struck, Pearl accompanied her handler to the scene of the disaster, searching for victims that were buried alive in the rubble. Pearl and her team rescued 12 people by digging through the rubble.

Pearl was honored as the ASPCA Dog of the Year in 2010.

Source: Huffington Post

Perhaps it is their turbulent beginnings that make shelter dogs and pets such wonderful companions, but no matter the reason we know they make unparalleled comrades. If you’re in the market for a new pet, check with your local shelters to see what pets are available for adoption and consider giving one of those pets a second chance.

  • 35th Anniversary
    35th Anniversary
  • United Way
    United Way