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Our organization is dedicated to helping people in our community break through the cycle of poverty and mental illness. This includes raising awareness about the experience of living with mental illness, to end the cycle of poverty for those that seek our services, and build bridges in our community for those who are lost. Discover how your help makes an impact.


  • Payee Clients Housed

    92%

  • Payees eliminate debt in first 6 mos

    87%

  • Program Participants

    4023

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  • Clubhouse Accreditation
    Clubhouse Accreditation

    For Immediate Release    Media Contact
    Rachel Newell
    Director of Development 
    316-665-8605
    rachel.newell@breakthroughwichita.org

    BREAKTHROUGH CLUBHOUSE GARNERS THREE-YEAR ACCREDITATION

    Wichita, Kan., June 12, 2019 – Breakthrough Clubhouse, a pre-vocational program of Breakthrough/Episcopal Social Services, received a three-year accreditation in May as an affiliate of the Clubhouse International, an organization that develops Clubhouses around the world.  The recognition is significant, as it points to a clear demonstration of a Clubhouse’s commitment to excellence.  Accreditation is awarded to Clubhouses that adhere to the International Standards for Clubhouse Programs, providing opportunities for Clubhouse members to find employment, go to school, build meaningful relationships and live healthy lifestyles. 

    The process is a rigorous one - both evaluative and consultative.  It includes a clubhouse self-study, site visit, dialogs regarding Clubhouse leadership and improvement opportunities, and a written report.  

    The accreditation process is conducted by members of the Clubhouse International faculty for Clubhouse Development.  The final report noted, “Members have a strong sense of pride and ownership in the  Clubhouse, there’s a strong culture of employment and an extremely active advocacy with the Kansas State Legislature which is resulting in solid support of Clubhouses in other parts of Kansas.”  David Kapten, Program Director for Breakthrough Clubhouse added, “This is an empowering program that supports self-directed recovery. Each member of the Clubhouse is needed and wanted.”  

    Clubhouses are local community centers that provide members with opportunities to build long-term relationships that, in turn, support them in obtaining employment, education and housing, including:
    •    a work-ordered day in which the talents and abilities of members are recognized and utilized within the Clubhouse;
    •    participation in consensus-based decision making regarding all important matters relating to the running of the Clubhouse;
    •    Opportunities to obtain paid employment in the local labor market through a Clubhouse-created Transitional Employment Program. In addition, members participate in Clubhouse-supported and independent programs;
    •    assistance in accessing community-based educational resources;
    •    access to crisis intervention services when needed, and;
    •    Evening/weekend social and recreational events.

    About Breakthrough Clubhouse 
    The Clubhouse Model is a unique program serving 386 people with mental illness in 2018.  It’s one of four primary programs of Breakthrough/Episcopal Social Services. Breakthrough has been an accredited Clubhouse since 1997 and continues to be the only one in Kansas. Clubhouses are a powerful demonstration that people with mental illness can and do lead normal, productive lives.  

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  • Mental Health Funding for certified Clubhouses as identified and funded by the Lottery Vending Machine legislation that became law in 2018.

  • Drawing from our history, our new name is "Breakthrough."

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Why You Should Allow Your High School Student to Take a Gap Year

If you’ve got one of those high schoolers lying around, you’re realizing you have only a few more years to get them ready to leave your nest. Dig back into the corners of your memory and remember 18 year-old you. You had big plans. Right? And for many of us the plan included jumping right into college. Then you watched your freshman year roommate meander through three majors that first year. You, on the other hand, were right on track. Right?

Kids these days are embracing the notion of a gap year. It has become a right of passage in the UK for generations. A gap year is when a high school senior takes a year or so to do life before entering college. Parents can be hesitant about gap years for a number of reasons, but we’re here to debunk the myths those parents have.

Myth: “My kid will forget how to study.”
If your child is college bound, they’ve been working hard to get the grades necessary to get into your alma mater. Pushing even the best students right into college where they have to adjust to independent study habits—while burnt out—may bring them right back home as a drop out. Students who take a year off report increased energy and enthusiasm for school.

Myth: “My kid won’t get into a good school.”
Taking a gap year actually can improve the chances of getting into a good school. Many schools allow deferrals for a gap year—or semester—because students who take gap years report higher grade point averages.

Myth: “My kid will fall behind his peers.”
Remember your freshman roommate who changed majors three times? Gap year students typically explore their interests during their time in the real world and come back having discovered their true passions. Gap year students typically don’t change majors, so they end up ahead. And really, what’s the rush to get into the workforce? You know what that’s like.

Myth: “I don’t have the money.”
Gap years can be achieved on any budget. And if you plan it right, you can actually save more money for college before enrolling. Gap years can consist of anything from backpacking Europe to helping an aging grandparent. Gap years are an interest of ours because some students choose to give back to causes they care about; and we think that’s cool.

  • 35th Anniversary
    35th Anniversary
  • United Way
    United Way